Ten Random Acts Of Kindness | For Under Ten Bucks

September 10, 2018


Kindness isn't measured by the dollar, it's the thought that counts.

10 Random Acts Of Kindness For Under $10
This week, as summer begins to wind down, our Ten on The Tenth posts resume. Our focus is Random Acts of Kindness for Under $10. 

I have to admit that when the topic came up, I thought it was truly worthwhile, but life's been a bit busy around here lately and I just wasn't sure if I'd have time to come up with a crafty and creative way to be kind for under ten bucks. 

So I declined. 

But as my week progressed, and I held the door open for a few people, made a donation and called a relative confined to a hospital, it suddenly dawned on me that many of the things I do on a regular basis are genuine acts of kindness. Even if I never really thought of them that way. 

These behaviors didn't take any great effort on my part and none of them cost me more than ten bucks...but they all made someone else smile.

That's when I emailed my girls and said, Hey, I'm in and they're so kind they said, Of course, come join us! So without further ado...here we go. 

Ten Random Acts Of Kindness For Under $10


A Go Fund Me Donation 


Give To Go Fund Me Campaigns

It's seems as if every week now, someone I know is in need. Either they are having a tough time themselves or they're raising money for charity or on behalf of loved one or friend. Every story is heartbreaking and I wish I could give generously to them all.

However, when I think of making a donation to a Go Fund Me campaign, I always used to say, well, if I can't give at least $25-$50...or more...then what's the point? How is that helpful? But this week, it dawned on me that every penny counts and if 1,000 people gave $10 each that's $10,000. And $10,000 is a ton of cash.

So the next time you have the urge to donate, but don't think your $5 or $10 contribution would make a difference, think again and go for it. And if you're not comfortable announcing to the world your name or amount, make them both anonymous. You'll know you helped someone in need and that's all the really matters.

Snail Mail


Sending Snail Mail Messages


Who loves getting mail? Oh I do, I do! I think everyone does. Even my kids, who have been brought up in a world of thank you texts and evites, still light up when the mailbox produces something with their name on it. Smiles all around.

Knowing that, I often send mail. Thank you notes, invitations, correspondence for all the traditional reasons and some just because. I can buy a stamp with change and get two cards for a buck at the dollar store. Sometimes, they have multipacks for the same price.

That's quite a bargain for the joy it brings...in snow, rain, heat and gloom of night. And all I have to do is walk the mailbox.

Make A Phone Call


Phone conversations are a lost art. Today, most people exchange short bursts of communication in 140 characters or less. Texting and social media comments have become the preferred way to check in, wish someone a happy birthday, a congratulations or a get well. However, there's really nothing like an actual chat on the phone...especially when it comes to an older relative or friend.

Their days can be long and lonely and being thought of enough for someone to pick up a phone and make a call, can make a huge difference. Sure, it takes some effort, a block of time and it may even be a bit boring, but I can guarantee the genuine excitement you'll hear on the other end of the receiver will be well worth it. And this one doesn't cost a dime.

A Slice Of Pizza 


We've all heard the stories about waitresses and strangers picking up meal tabs and they're wonderful. They certainly restore our faith in humanity, but let's face it, meals can be pricey. Who says you have to pay for the whole meal though? A slice of pizza and a fountain soda are less than ten bucks. So is a whole pie in some places, with a coupon. And who doesn't love free pizza?

Coffee


Happy Coffee


This one's easy and I think a lot of us have already done it. Just tell the clerk you'd like to pay for the person behind you while you're grabbing your morning fix and you're good to go. Don't want to deal with the wait while they order? No problem, you can hand someone a gift card on your way out of the cafe. Easy peasy and what a way to start someone's day.

Hold A Door 


kindness isn't measured by the dollar, it's the thought that counts


This one always makes me laugh. I literally hold the door for everyone behind me. It's a habit I was raised on. It's rote, like saying please and thank you...and yet. I would say one out of every three times I do it, I am met with excited astonishment. Do most people not hold doors? Why is it so shocking?

I mean, isn't holding a door open for someone basically me exiting a building and keeping the door from slamming into someone else's face...I mean hello. Why would I not do this?? But I digress.

During the week, in addition to my regular door holding, I held the door for a woman moving into a building and another entering the post office with huge boxes. Each was so thrilled by my intervention they stopped to tell me how kind I was. They were happy for the help and I left feeling like a champ. For free.

Report Service With A Smile 


Ok, so this one may not seem like a big deal, but believe me, having worked retail and customer service jobs, heck even my teaching job, I know how great it is to be told, nice job.

Almost everyone will make the effort to complain about poor service, rude behavior or an unsatisfactory experience...but how many times do people stop to track the manager or a supervisor down, or compose an email to the principal, to praise a job well done?

Many companies have programs in place to reward good behavior and even if they don't, it's always great to have your superior approach you during the day to say, wow, you're doing an awesome job.

Sure, it may take a few extra minutes before you can leave the store or hang up the phone, but knowing that it will positively impact someone's day can make it all worth it.

Grocery Store Flowers


Rainbow Roses

I love flowers and sometimes I buy them for myself, but there's nothing like receiving a happy bunch of blooms from someone else. At the grocery store there are always bouquets for less than ten dollars and whether you give them to the cashier on the way out, a stranger in the parking lot or a leave them on a friend's doorstep, I guarantee a return on your investment in the form of a giant smile.

Let Someone Go Ahead Of You On Line


This one is the easiest and another thing I did this week. I had a basket full of food and the woman behind me had four things in her arms. There was only one lane open at the shop, so I offered to let her go ahead of me. She was thrilled.

Turns out it was her little ones first day back to school and she was trying to catch the bus, but forgot a few items at the store. Oh boy, do I remember those days. I was so grateful that I didn't have that pressure anymore and she was so grateful that I let her cut me in line that she told me I was amazing and I'd made her day. Fabulous.

Visit Someone At A Nursing Home


We Rise By Lifting Others

So this one is not easy, but it's very personal to me. As many of you may know, my mom was in and out of a nursing home toward the end of her life. It was a lovely facility and she had visitors almost every day, as I went between three to five times a week, along with my sisters and brother.

However, many, if not most of the residents there, rarely if ever had visitors. It used to break my heart.

Some of them were truly beyond interaction, but many were not. They craved it. I made a concerted effort to learn their names, to stop and comment on their pretty hair or say hello or ask how their day was on the way to my mom's room and the smiles and reactions I received from my simple gestures left me teary-eyed and touched beyond measure.

These sweet souls had such interesting lives and stories to share and were eager to do so. My husband used to sit with a gentleman who was a WWII veteran some nights while I was with my mom. They would talk about the war, about the battles about the technology and they were both so much lighter after there conversations.

Yes, visiting a nursing home is free, but it's tough. I get that. It can be very sad, it takes a lot of time and effort to plan and visit, but I can tell you for sure, this gesture will have a dramatic impact on someone's life. And it will leave you feeling so grateful for everything you have in your own.

I've often thought of going back up the nursing home to visit since my mom passed.

So far, I haven't been able to do it.

Perhaps it's too soon.

But someday...I'll go there and spread some kindness.

Until then, there's always that coffee.

What would you add to the list?

**Looking for more ways to spread some kindness? Be sure to visit my Ten On The Tenth friends to see what they're sharing today!**

Ten On The Tenth


60 comments:

  1. You are one amazing lady Kim. It brought tears to my eyes reading about your Mom and all those people who don't get any visitors. It's so sad that at the end of their beautiful lives that they're forgotten. It's one of the main reasons we can't immigrate with our kids to Canada. My Mom would be all by her self in her old age home and I can't bear the thought of doing that to her. My kids have their whole lives ahead of them and my Mom's is coming to and end so I'm going to make sure I'm there until the very end and you know what, I'll be visiting with quite a few of the other ladies and gentlemen too while I'm there.

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    1. Michelle, I am so sorry to hear about your mom. It's a very, very hard thing to go through, both as the daughter and for your mom, as well. My heart just breaks for everyone dealing with this...I'm sending you huge, huge hugs. ❤️

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  2. What wonderful ideas. I do many of the things that you mentioned. How fabulous when kindness is engrained in our everyday that we don't even have to think of it. Thanks for sharing. The nursing home idea is a really good one.

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    1. Thanks Katie! I had a kind momma and she taught me well...

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  3. Great post, great “Acts of Kindness!”
    Good thoughts about “Go Fund Me” . . . every little bit helps.
    I liked the NH “freebie” . . .
    it doesn't cost a cent to say hello, mention a name, touch ones hand . . .
    And the joy it brings for “the other” matches the joy “from the giver.”

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    1. I'm glad you enjoyed this one, Lynne. The NH one is personal to me. I saw the effects of a quick interaction. It really does make a difference.

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  4. You really got me thinking Kim. My mom always brought me up to be kind to the elderly and I do. Some are crotchety but most others are so sweet. I remember when I was a girlscout and at Christmas time, one of our "good deeds" was to go to the local nursing home and visit with a chosen person. I would make them a craft for a gift as well. I still remember the joy in their eyes being the recipient. I felt wonderful too. I think I'm overdue with my visit. Thank you for sharing your story. Cindy

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    1. Cindy, thank you for sharing *your* story. It must have been hard to go the nursing home as a youngster. It was tough for me, as an adult. I really would like to get back there to spread some cheer again sometime soon...

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  5. Lots of inspiration here and a nice reminder that so much of what we do automatically, like holding doors, does impact the lives of others even a little bit. Thanks for your post. It made me smile.

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    1. Thanks Lorri! There's such an emphasis on the whole "Random Acts Of Kindness" thing today, but I wanted to point out that most of us are kind on a daily basis and it does make a difference. Your comment made me smile...thanks for taking the time to leave it!

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  6. This was such an inspirational post Kim. I love all of these ideas. I have started this too by holding a door open for someone. Some of the simplest things bring a smile to someone’s face.
    Have a nice week.
    Julie

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    1. Thanks Julie! It really is the simple things…enjoy the weekend!

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  7. It brought tears to my eyes too when I read about your Mom. My own mom is struggling to stay in her home - she can no longer climb the stairs - but if the time ever comes that she has to go to an old age home your words will be with me! I think if everyone put your suggestions into action - (who can't manage one per month?) - we'd all be better for it :)

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    1. Hi Sara. I'm so sorry to hear about your mom, it really is such a heartbreaking time. We tried to keep my mom with us for as long as possible and yes, when the time came that the nursing home was the only option left, it was tough to get there every day, but so worth it. I do wish you and your mom the best...and totally agree, we'd all be better for it. Sending you smiles...

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  8. So easy and so simple but what a huge impact it can make to someone’s day. Because I’m tall the one thing I volunteer to do when at the grocery store is to reach something on a top shelf. What a look of relief you get on their face. If you shop at Aldi’s give someone your cart. It’s only a quarter but people are happy to not have to get a cart out of lock up. One other thing may be a hug. Just a small hug given to someone you know is so enlightening for them and for me. Loved this post! Needs to be more nice things happening then what we see nowadays.

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    1. Barbara, I love all of your suggestions...especially the hugs. I'm a hugger! I also laughed at your tall comment. I'm tall, too and often help people reach things at the grocery store. They really are so appreciative. It never really dawned on me what an issue that could be, because I can reach...but if I couldn't, wow. That would be a problem. I think I need to write another post adding everyone's great suggestions, since we really do need more nice!

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  9. What a great point about making a donation, even if it isn't a huge one. The important point is that a lot of people join together to help.

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    1. I love it...yes, joining together for kindness. What could be better than that?

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  10. non cook that I am … I would add 'baking little treats for people.' taking them to a person on a rainy or cloudy day. I watched my mother do almost every single one of the things you've listed. it was just a part of our lives. we hold doors for people. and let people go ahead of us if they need to. and I never thought of it as anything special. it's just the way we were taught! I guess those days of learning graciousness and kindness and even manners are pretty much gone. everyone is in such a hurry these days. or always looking down into their phones! and even in eating... taking the last piece! :) remember that one? sounds like you were raised the same way. posts like yours might help in bringing a lot of the 'old' ways of caring and kindness back! I hope so.
    I remember when we moved to Virginia. we were all tired as you ARE when you move across the country to a new place. and our neighbor brought over a freshly made apple pie! I still remember that pie to this day. and what a lovely surprise it was. xo

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    1. Tammy, I love this. I don't enjoy baking or cooking, but I do love pie and would be thrilled to receive one. It's the kind of gesture that really can make someone's day. It truly is the little things. I think people try to hard to make it about grand acts when a smile, a hug or a pie are enough to have a great impact. ❤️

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  11. This is such a great post Kim. I am so on board with this way of thinking. It is amazing what you can do with very little to make a great act of kindness for someone. I love to go out to eat and then whatever the bill comes to that is what I leave for a tip. Service industry peeps make so little in hourly wage and really live off their tips. I try to remember that when I have had great service. So instead of a customary 20% tip I try to leave the amount of the bill for them too. I cannot do this all the time but when I have had great service and can see this person has been so kind to us it feels good to do it. It is amazing how every little bit counts. When I did post on raising money for Cooper's rescue people sent a few dollars and apologized they could not do more. OMG with all the little amounts sent it added up to a big amount for the rescue. So you are so right if everyone just gave a little it adds up quickly. Loved reading this today Kim. I was really touched by your post. Have a great new week.
    xoxo
    Kris

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    1. Thanks Kris. You are a super kind person, you're always helping others and you inspire me. It really doesn't take much to make a huge difference in someone's day and when we band together, what a dramatic impact we could have. I love your tip idea. As a former waitress, I always tip very, very well for good service, too. I actually always offer to pay the tip or kick in extra quietly once the bill is settled. It's only a few bucks for me, but it's split among many at the restaurant. I'm not sure people always understand that...

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  12. Kim it had never occurred to me that holding the door is a random act of kindness it is simply done here. But you are so right, where I can from it was not a common behavior. I love the idea of the pizza too! Of course the best one is the nursing home. When I was in the hospital years ago I would sit and talk to the elder patients that had no one to visit them. It truly made a difference in their day.

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    1. Mary, I think that too many people try to make a big deal about the whole kindness thing, when really, the simple things are often the most appreciated. I love it when someone holds the door for me...and who doesn't love free pizza!

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  13. Wonderful post. I too notice that many people are surprised by someone holding the door for them. Like you I was brought up to be courteous to others, it is second nature. An act of kindness I can suggest involves caretakers. When my husband was in Hospice I felt so alone. As his ability to get out of bed weakened I was unable to leave him for very long periods of time because he needed help going to the bathroom. My mother came a few times to sit with him but I didn't make it through my dinner out because he called wanting to go to the bathroom. Then one day an old fishing buddy called and asked if he could come talk fishing. After I said yes he told me to make plans to run errands or just go out and enjoy myself however long I wanted. That was the greatest blessing to me. Not because he came to visit, but that he offered without being asked. The gift of time has more value than money anyday. Thanks again for theis wonderful post.

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    1. I'm so sorry to hear about your husband, that must've been a very, very difficult and heartbreaking time. I'm sure that visit from his buddy was a great comfort to you and meant a lot to your husband, as well. In turn, I bet his friend felt good about his time spent there and the comfort it brought to you both. It really is the personal connections and the small gestures that make a difference. They don't cost anything and I think our world needs more of it. Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts with us...sending smiles to you.

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  14. Wonderful post, Kim! I'm a door-holder-open too ~ amazing how just that one little thing brings out beautiful smiles and grins.

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    1. Totally, Bobbie...and doesn't cost a thing!

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  15. Best post ever !!! Linda in Tn.

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    1. Linda, thank you so much for your kindness...you just made my day!!!

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  16. Such thoughtful, caring and simple acts of kindness that can change an entire outlook for the day, week or year!

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  17. This is a powerful collection of ideas Kim. I also liked the idea of realizing we do things every single day:)

    Laura
    White Spray Paint

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    1. That was the most important part for me, Laura. I think most of us are kinder than we think!!

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  18. Kim, thanks for pointing out the tiny little things that make the world so much better! Like some have commented, it seems that these niceties are going by the wayside. I do believe that moms still teach their kids door holding and things like that but those polite ways seem to be less and less with time.

    We have gone through the nursing home scenario too and I would agree with everything you said. Those little old people need interaction desperately. It helps them feel loved and to hold on to the world. They love it when kids come too!

    So glad you shared this wonderful post with us today. :)

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    1. Stacey, thank you for asking me to join this lovely group of ladies each month. I have learned a lot and you make me think…and help spread a little kindness perhaps. Nothing better than that…

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  19. These are all wonderful ways you can make someone's day, Kim! Yes, the door thing - I don't get it, isn't that just standard that you would hold a door for someone? I'm always shocked at the amount of people who do NOT do that!! I always let people go ahead of me on line in the grocery store also, if I have a cart full and they have only a few things. It's cute how appreciative they are!

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    1. I love the unexpected smiles I get, too, Debbie.

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  20. Good morning Kim! A lovely list of easy ways to be kind. That GoFundMe thing is true. If more people donated $5 - and shared the amount, even if not their name - then more people might feel like it was worth the effort. Perhaps it would help if the sponsor suggested a donation of $10 or less.
    My unwitting contribution for the day was giving a tin of Badger Stress Soother to a veteran with PTSD. I almost always buy 2 and give away both of them,then go nuy more. I gave some to a lady who belongs to a "spouses of vets with PTSD" group, she shared it with the group and now dozens more people have a way to deal with stress! Sometimes I have no idea if the recipients ever use it again, but that's not the point.
    While it is yet the 10th, perhaps I need to ... call my brother, whose birthday it is.

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    1. Happy Birthday to your brother...and Nancy I love your act of kindness. I think it probably means more than you know...

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  21. A great post, Kim, full of good ideas. The odd thing is that my son has told me that a man doesn't dare hold the door for a woman at work now. They consider it an insult. Can you imagine?

    I think it matters to just smile at someone in the grocery store, etc., not look through them as if they were invisible. Of course you have to be careful with that and listen to your own intuition but I know I appreciate not being ignored. A smile from a stranger is uplifting.

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    1. Dewena, I have heard that, I have also heard that women get annoyed when men offer to pay for dinner and and when a gentleman lets a woman go through the door first. Perhaps we're taking about chivalry rather than kindness, but I think that chivalry is kindness. I think it's a sign of good manner and respect. Perhaps I'm dating myself, but my husband and guy friends still stand when ladies get up at a table and when we go on a walk at night, my husband always moves to the outside. I think there's something very romantic about that. I think these ladies today are missing out, but that's just me...and who doesn't love a smile! 😊

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  22. These were all great ideas! Some were second nature for a lot of us but have been lost in technology. Some are just common courtesy, also a lost art. Thanks for inspiring us again!

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    1. Totally agree, AnnMarie. When I was young everyone held the door, cars stopped at crosswalks to let people walk by and the like. Different times and I miss them…thanks for the visit.

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  23. Fabulous ideas!! If we all did something special for another person it would sure make a lot of happy people!! It's the little things that count!

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  24. All wonderful ideas, Kim! It's the little things... ;)

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  25. Kim, everything you mentioned is something that most of us do a million times a week and don't even realize that they are considered acts of kindness. But, sometimes it is good to be reminded. When my grandmother was in the nursing home, we always included her room mate when we brought her home for holidays. It is so sad the amount of people that have no family left. When Jerry's sister was in nursing home, we would sneak our dog in to visit with her and her room mates. It was the highlight of their day. Hope all are safe with the horrible hurricanes on the east coast..xxoJudy

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    1. Judy, there was a gentleman who brought his pup into the nursing home a few times when we were there and he made everyone smile. I think they should have pups on staff!! And yes, we always brought treats and included my mom's roommates in our visits when possible. Every little bit helps!! xoxox

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  26. What a great post, Kim. Yep- I do random small acts of kindness all the time. The payoff is the "feel good" emotion that fills my heart.
    You know we are in real estate and our office just launched a campaign yesterday that EVERY agent is going to give 25% of their own commission to the client's charity of choice- school, church, cancer treatment-whatever. It is ongoing and will always be part of our policy from now on. Every single dime makes a difference and you are right- 1000 giving $5. makes a HUGE difference.
    Love to you- have a great day- xo Diana

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    1. Diana, I know what a giving soul you are...you are an inspiration to many and the way you send messages of kindness and hope through your blog are a great example for all of us...as are your volunteer days with the vets. I'm not at all surprised by your choice to implement the charity program at your office. What a wonderful and very generous idea...xxoo

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  27. A great post Kim!! I try to do my part daily as well, because I like to do it. It makes me feel like I am making the world a better place.
    I like all your ideas.

    I do give flowers. I do this weekly. I will give away bouquets. I LOVE doing this, I love the smiles I see and sometimes the stories I hear too. Sometimes the bouquet is just what a person needed. I may hear about what happened during the week or day, and how this bouquet just lifts them up!
    I also love sending snail mail!!

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    1. Carla, you inspire me constantly with your service to others. Your bouquets of flowers, your meals on wheels service and the time you spend with those you deliver to always stick in my mind. Your kindness is so evident, it's clearly innate and has obviously rubbed off on your children...especially Sam at this moment, who has chosen to spend his life in service. How amazing. 💙 You, my friend, are definitely making a difference.

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  28. All great ideas! I've called a store to report great service and it feels so good! Okay, now I want pizza and coffee. :) Happy Friday!

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    1. Haha! Now I want pizza and coffee, too, Lisa!! And it does feel good. I always send back those customer service emails. They take like 10 seconds and make someone's day. Happy Weekend!

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  29. This was such an amazing post, Kim. I try to do many of those things on a regular basis. I'm with you about holding doors, but we must live in a really considerate community, because I'm very often on the receiving end of that one. The one I would add to your list is giving to the homeless. I keep plastic bags in our car, filled with hotel goodies (shampoo, soap, & a toothbrush & toothpaste...when you see the dentist every 4-6 months, those accumulate quickly), plus a few bucks, and hand them out to the poor souls I see on the street corners. These people are so often judged very harshly by the everyday public, but they are human beings, and we have no way of knowing what circumstances brought them to this end. This post was a great reminder to give more of myself, so thank you.

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    1. Carol, that is such a generous and thoughtful idea. I’m sure you’ve made a real difference in the lives of many. I mentioned in another comment that I may need to write up an additional post with all the great ideas you ladies have added. So much kindness…I love it! Thanks for sharing with us.

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  30. Kindness is King...

    Kindness need not cost us anything, but is so often well received … particularly with older folks.
    A smile a kind word works wonders and makes such a difference to someone's day.
    Great post, and a thoughtful post, Kim … my thanks.

    All the best Jan

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  31. I love this, Kim. Sometimes when you give your best, your time or attention or thought, it is every bit as encouraging and helpful as cash. Not always, of course, but it is so important.

    I loved the one about holding the door because it made me remember a time when I went with my brother to buy our mom a gift. There was a woman coming into the store behind us and my brother held the door for her. It turned out that she was a tour guide with at least 50 people behind her and my brother found himself standing holding the door for all of them with me laughing the whole time. Naturally, they were all in line at the cashier ahead of us :-)
    Amalia
    xo

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