How To Train A Climbing Vine On A Trellis

September 9, 2014



Train your climbing vine to maximize its beauty, while keeping it in line!

easy diy gardening


Last year, I wrote about my gorgeous Morning Glory plant. My husband has been growing this cottage beauty on the garage wall for years in an effort to keep me quiet! You see that large, bare, ugly white wall is directly across from my kitchen and a very large bank of windows. I was considering some potentially pricey solutions to decorate it, when he decided to take matters into his own hands, for just a few pennies, with a packet of seeds.

His quick thinking worked out very well for both of us. He got off cheap and I got a gorgeous addition to my cottage garden.



Of course, many people who saw my original post, commented that Morning Glory can be very invasive. This is true, but I have to say that it has been a very well behaved resident in my garden all these years, perhaps because we have given it a very specific area in which to grow.  Every spring, my husband strings up his trellis. Once the shoots pop up, the plant takes off on its predetermined path.

If Morning Glory is not your cup of gardening tea, you can use this method with any similar type of vine.

We start by anchoring a premade trellis, both in the ground and to the wall. We picked ours up at a local garden center for about ten bucks. We screw it into the wall, so it will support the weight of the full grown plant.


Next, small nails are put in the siding trim. Nails can also be put directly into the siding of the house if you are not going all the way to the top of your structure. Just make sure you use the proper nail for your surface.


You will need to add nails across your surface, based upon the space you have to fill and the design your are looking to achieve. We opted for a "V"~ had we extended the nails out horizontally from the trellis as well, creating a grid, the entire wall could be covered with leaves. Hmm...maybe next year! 


Once the nails are in place, string is tied from the trellis to the nail. As the plant grows and the tendrils reach the end of  the trellis, we simply guide it, by hand, to the strings. The plant does the rest on its own. Smart little sucker.  


Eventually it reaches the roof. In most areas it just stops growing or grows back down the vine onto itself again. Sometimes, it finds one of the clips from our solar panel and it grows on the roof for a bit. That it ok, the vines are very superficial, but we could just clip them if we wanted to keep them in check.  


There you go, an easy DIY to train your vine and decorate your outside space with a bit of cottage flair. This is how last year's plant looked in July. It was just getting started.


This is how my plant looks today, in September. It is very full, blooming like mad, covering my garage with gorgeous purple flowers and still, very well behaved. It casually mingles with the zinnias, but does not invade their space.

You can see now why we anchor the trellis to the house. You can also see that as a bit of cooler air has come our way, the Morning Glory is starting to degrade.


That's ok, I will miss my beautiful wall of color, but I am armed and ready for next year with my  trellis design...and now so are you! Any flat outdoor wall will do! Just imagine how cute this would look on a potting shed or better yet, your husband's tool shed! Fabulous!


Now if I could just figure out a way to get my kids to walk the line this well, I'd really be in business!

Is your garden well behaved? 



Sign up for email and follow the fun. 

Tips, tricks, crafts and giggles delivered straight to you!



   

16 comments:

  1. Kim- That is gorgeous. I LOVE Morning Glories. You know I can grow just about anything but I have THE WORST luck with Morning Glories. Can't grow them for love or money. lol I guess I will just have to admire yours. xo Diana

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha! Those morning glories have a wild, fun and free spirited air about them...they seem like a perfect fit for you! Perhaps they know who'd be boss in your garden and it doesn't suit them! ;)

      Delete
  2. Your morning glory is amazing! I love the way it covers such a large space. Ours is growing up a trellis and then up the gutter. Love it!! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ours is already beginning to lose it's luster. It makes me sad to watch it wilt and fade, but the flowers really are spectacular! :) I bet yours are too!

      Delete
  3. I love Morning Glories, Kim. They make me smile. I've grown them in the past and never had a problem with them invading my garden. They were always in designated areas, as you mentioned. Yours are beautiful. So are the zinnias! xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Nancy! I have heard of people getting overrun, but mine behave as well! I guess that's a good thing!

      Delete
  4. Kim
    That is a great idea. It was great having your stop by today. Thank you so much for your sweet comment. Hope all is well.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Smart husband! Cost-effective solution / beauty to boot.

    And your zinnias are stunning! I love zinnias...such a wonderful flower and so many varieties to enjoy ! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My husband gets very smart, very quickly whenever I say that I want to renovate! It's amazing! ;)

      Delete
  6. Hi Kim, wow your Morning Glory looks so pretty! What a nice solution you and your husband came up with! Wishing you a nice weekend.
    Julie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Julie. I do like flowers, even if i am not very good at growing them! :)

      Delete
  7. Looks great! I would love it if you joined and contribute your awesome posts at my link party at City of Creative Dreams, starts on Fridays :D Hope to see you there at City of Creative Dreams Link Party.

    ReplyDelete
  8. How beautiful, Kim! I bet you really enjoy your view now.

    ReplyDelete

Hey~ before you go, let me know what you think! I love comments and respond to them all. Thanks so much for visiting! *Please note that if your comment contains a hyperlink it will not be published.